Craig M Dick

My slanted perspective on agricultural marketing

Tag: Sales

Venn Marketing

No I am not talking about Zen, the Buddhist act of mediation. Though a little more reflection and considered thoughts on a subject would help a lot of marketers out.

I am talking about Venn, or specially, Venn diagrams. A Venn diagram is a diagram that shows all possible logical relations between a finite collection of different sets. Typically overlapping shapes, usually circles, are used.

venn marketing

Venn Marketing is then only talking about the logical relations between what you do and what your customer cares about. Everything else is a distraction.

Your customer is self-absorbed with their own set of problems.  They don’t want to, need to or deserve to know everything you know.

Until you have built trust, found out what their problems are, only talk about what you can do to solve those problems. If you can’t help them, tell them. Then refer them to someone who can.

Too many rookie marketing and sales people verbally vomit the whole load all over a prospect at the first meeting. DO NOT DO THIS.

Working with a client is just like meeting a new friend. Take it slow, find commonality, decide if you like each other, find out what they care about. Only talk about that.

Once you have proven you have their best interest in mind, they will ask you what else you can do for them. They will solicit you to know how else you can improve their business. It so much easier to sell somebody when they are compelled to know more about you.

 

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More thoughts on Trust

Last week I had the honor of speaking to Titan Pro’s dealer network on soil health. One of my fellow speakers was Jeff Beals.  WheTrustn Jeff is not speaking or consulting, he serves as executive vice president at NAI NP Dodge Commercial Real Estate Company and is co-host/producer of an award-winning business talk-show on 1110 KFAB Radio.

When I lived in the Omaha area I enjoyed listening to his radio program on the weekends, so it was a real highlight of the conference to share a stage with Jeff and then listen to his talk.

The topic Jeff spoke was How to Sell in Brutally Competitive Environments. The key to sales in a brutal environment, trust. You must develop trust to be effective.

Jeff’s 5 steps to develop trust are:

  1. Clear communication
  2. Pass a moment of truth (when you have the opportunity to be truthful, you had better be)
  3. Consistent performance
  4. Behave as a fiduciary
  5. Be responsive

These all are in alignment with Margie Warrell’s 3 core domains of Trust, which you know I am a fan of.

I couple of other tips I really liked from Jeff’s talk were:

Customer before commission

This aligns with my definition of trust, I have faith that you will do what is in my best interest. Once you truly server your customer, you will be in demand and you won’t need to worry about commissions. Worry about yourself first, then you will always be worried about your commissions.

Jeff’s deadly sin of sales – is to assume

I think many people in sales and marketing think they know what the customer wants and are fearful to ask too many questions out of fear. Fear they will look dumb. If you want to build trust, and ultimately a sale, you must know what the customer wants. The only way to do that is Jeff’s rule #1 (see above).

Over the past couple weeks though I have realized one thing is missing from Maggie, Jeff and my keys to building trust.

Trust is reciprocal. What I mean by that is, you have to trust to be trusted.  More on that in a future post.

Make sure you check out Jeff’s work, and if your group is looking for a speaker, I would recommend him for any event you are planning.

 

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Do You Compel or Convince Cattle?

Have you ever tried bringing cattle in from the pasture to a corral? Which do you prefer: driving them in or grabbing a bucket of grain and calling them in?Do You Compel or Convince Cattle?

For the bucket of grain to work, you must consistently spend a few minutes each day in contact with the herd. This brings the cattle to trust you and become familiar with your bucket of grain. When you walk into the pasture, they come running and will follow you into the corral because they want what you have, and in a few minutes, the entire herd is corralled.

The corralling is quick and easy; the hardest part of the work is that short, consistent, daily interaction with the herd.

If you don’t have consistent contact with the cattle, or show up looking different on corral day, the bucket of grain doesn’t work. Your only option is to get a few people on four wheelers or horses and over-power, wear-down, and chase the herd, into the corral.

It’s usually not quick and generally not easy. It takes a plan and effort. Many cows in the herd will object to the idea of being corralled. Some will change their minds once they’re in the corral and try to get out. And while you may be able to overcome all these objections and finally corral them all, it’s very hard work at the time. Some of the cattle are going to be dissatisfied with the results.

The selling game is a lot like corralling cattle.

You can get up and put your on selling boots, overcome objections and always be closing. Lots of effort and hard work at the time.

Or you can do a little work every day to build trust with the herd. Once the offer is made, the herd comes running.

Nothing is better than having people lined up who can’t wait to give you their money for your product or service. Isn’t that the dream of every business owner?

A customer that is compelled – or even driven – to purchase your product doesn’t get buyer’s remorse. They become a champion for you. They tell their friends. Their enthusiasm for the product can compel more people to join your cause. More people line up to give you their money.

So, why is being an “order-taker” considered a slur on sales people?

Why is it that most sales people think they need to go belly-to-belly and convince the prospect they must have their solution?

Marketing to build customer acceptance and desire for the product should be the number one tool for every sales person. It is more work than pulling on the sales boots and chasing down and over powering the customer.  But it creates satisfied customers who come back time and time again for your product or services, resulting long-term relationships that benefit you and your customer.

 

The post Do You Compel or Convince Cattle? first appeared on CraigMDick.com

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